Although everyone suspected that the National Security Agency (NSA) was listening in on conversations, the Edward Snowden leaks rocked the world with the extent of what the agency was able to do.

Unfortunately it has now come out that the surveillance extends to more than just the NSA: According to a report by Ars Technica, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), a subdivision of the Department of Justice (DOJ) had been maintaining their own database of phone metadata.

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Last year, U.S. officials were quick to blame North Korea for being responsible of the cyberattack on Sony Pictures without offering a lot of details on exactly how they arrived at that conclusion. The accusations were met with skepticism by security professionals, and the investigation was mocked by the very same hackers who claimed to be the authors of the hack, a group named Guardians of Peace.

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Google has suspended sales of its Google Glass eyewear, and announced plans to put the project under different management.

Following poor reviews and critical press coverage, including numerous privacy concerns, sales of the smartglasses have been halted for an indeterminate period of time. The company says sales of Google Glass - which sold for $1,500 at launch - will be suspended from next week onward, and the project placed under different management.

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Microsoft and Major League Gaming are teaming up to host and broadcast the largest Call of Duty Championship event in history. The finals, which are scheduled to take place in March, will be hosted in Los Angeles, CA and carries a grand prize of $1,000,000 to the winning team. The prize money is a huge step up from last years $400,000 grand prize and will be competed for using Sledgehammer's newest Call of Duty Advanced Warfare game.

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A British man has been arrested as part of an ongoing investigation into a series of DDoS attacks against Microsoft's Xbox Live and Sony's PlayStation Network over the festive season, following another arrest made last month.

The 18-year-old man is believed to be a member of the group behind the attacks, 'Lizard Squad', and he was arrested this morning in Southport, United Kingdom by officers from the Cyber Crime Unit of the UK's South East Regional Organised Crime Unit (SEROCU). Police also confiscated "a number of electronic and digital devices" during the arrest, as part of their investigation.

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A source has said a "bad code update" that failed to roll back was responsible for the outage that took out Microsoft's Bing, and also Yahoo's search engine which relies on Bing.

After Microsoft pushed out a new update, the code turned out to be "bad" and crashed Bing and its servers. Microsoft engineers tried to roll it back the update, but the procedure failed. Engineers were forced to shut down servers to get back the point where everything worked smoothly.

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Social media users beware: only a few days after the United States Central Command (CENTCOM) Twitter feed was hacked by pro-ISIS pranksters, Twitter feeds belonging to two major news agencies were similarly compromised to spread a very serious message.

The Twitter feeds of UPI and the New York Post were compromised this morning, in a seemingly coordinated attack spelling doomsday for the world. Both accounts sent out a wave of tweets detailing how a US aircraft carrier had been attacked in the South China Sea by Chinese anti-ship missiles, sparking all-out war.

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The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said it will hold a vote in February on proposed net neutrality rules, which would stop Internet providers from blocking or throttling access to websites.

The Chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, said to colleagues before Christmas that he intends to circulate a draft proposal internally next month with a vote to take place weeks later. An FCC spokesperson declined to comment, but confirmed the February timetable.

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After the recent terrorist attack on France-based satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which globally besmirched the name of Islam, hacking group Anonymous has launched an offensive against Islamic websites promoting extremism in any way. The initiative code-named '#OpCharlieHebdo' seeks to shut down extremist websites through rather unsophisticated but effective DDoS attacks; the same method used by Lizard squad to render Xbox Live and PlayStation Network offline last month.

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The hacker group that calls itself the Lizard Squad took down PSN and Xbox Live last week with a massive DDoS attack. Now, it looks like they're selling the attack as a service to anyone who can pay.

The attacks last week screwed things up for gamers who wanted to play their newly unwrapped toys. It turns out the Lizard Squad may not have just been messing around. They may have been using the attacks as marketing for a theoretically legitimate stress testing (read: DDoS) service they just started selling.

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