Amid ongoing public backlash over Superfish, Lenovo has said it wants to make the situation better and promised to develop a "concrete plan" to address concerns with "software vulnerabilities".

In an open letter, Lenovo CTO Peter Hortensius said the company is developing a "concrete plan" with "defined actions", he said the options include "creating a cleaner PC image", "working directly with users, privacy/security experts and others to create the right preload strategy quickly" and "assessing the opinions of even our harshest critics in evaluating our products going-forward".

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A hacker who hijacked computers to make death threats has been jailed for eight years.

Yusuke Katayama played a game of cat and mouse with the authorities, leading them to make numerous wrongful arrests.

He threatened a massacre at a comic book event, as well as to attack a school attended by the grandchildren of Japan's Emperor Akihito.

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The US government has developed spyware that invades the firmware of hard drives and eavesdrops on everything the user does. The software has been found on the computers around the world.

The latest spyware software was discovered by the Russian computer security company, Kaspersky Lab, which found computers of government and military institutions, telecommunication companies, banks, energy companies, nuclear researchers, media, and Islamic activists were infected.

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UK surveillance agency GCHQ has been working closely with US government agencies such as the NSA through the sharing of classified intelligence for some time, and has recently been officially censured for not disclosing the nature of its relationship.

The Investigatory Powers Tribunal said that GCHQ failed to clarify details about how it shared data from its mass internet surveillance project until sometime around December of last year. Apparently, this is IPT's first ruling against an intelligence agency in its 15-year history.

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Yet another file sharing website is to close its doors permanently on Tuesday, March 31st 2015. At this point it's unclear if this is a business decision, or if the closure was prompted due to legal reasons.

File sharing sites have seemingly fallen one after the other in the past two or three years, with MegaUpload being one of the high profile websites closed due in part to intervention by the United States and, allegedly, lawyers representing movie studios or the record industry having a say in the matter.

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Although everyone suspected that the National Security Agency (NSA) was listening in on conversations, the Edward Snowden leaks rocked the world with the extent of what the agency was able to do.

Unfortunately it has now come out that the surveillance extends to more than just the NSA: According to a report by Ars Technica, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), a subdivision of the Department of Justice (DOJ) had been maintaining their own database of phone metadata.

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Facebook has paid an Indian security researcher $12,500 (~£8,120) for discovering a major bug on its social platform which would have otherwise allowed hackers to delete almost any photo on the network without the owner's permission. The researcher, Laxman Muthiyah accomplished this feat by using the Graph API, Facebook's developer platform, and tricking Facebook into thinking that he was the owner of all the photos, which subsequently granted him permission to delete any photo on the social network.

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Google has suspended sales of its Google Glass eyewear, and announced plans to put the project under different management.

Following poor reviews and critical press coverage, including numerous privacy concerns, sales of the smartglasses have been halted for an indeterminate period of time. The company says sales of Google Glass - which sold for $1,500 at launch - will be suspended from next week onward, and the project placed under different management.

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Up to $1 billion has been stolen from 100 banks around the world by a group of international cyber criminals over a two year period, according to the Russian computer security company, Kaspersky Lab.

The group, known as Carbanak, took the unusual approach of stealing directly from banks, instead of going through customers. Carefully crafted emails were used to trick employees into opening malicious software, which allowed access to the banks' internal networks and video surveillance.

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A British man has been arrested as part of an ongoing investigation into a series of DDoS attacks against Microsoft's Xbox Live and Sony's PlayStation Network over the festive season, following another arrest made last month.

The 18-year-old man is believed to be a member of the group behind the attacks, 'Lizard Squad', and he was arrested this morning in Southport, United Kingdom by officers from the Cyber Crime Unit of the UK's South East Regional Organised Crime Unit (SEROCU). Police also confiscated "a number of electronic and digital devices" during the arrest, as part of their investigation.

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