Russia has passed a series of new 'anti-terrorism' laws that will make services like Skype illegal unless companies change their practices within six months.

The new laws require that service operators such as Skype, Facebook and Google's Gmail store Russian user data on servers that are located in the country. Why? Well, if Russian authorities want access to this data, they need the servers to be located on their soil so that they can legally request the information.

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At the beginning of the month, it was reported that the number one paid app in the Google Play Store was a complete scam. Virus Shield, a one-click protection software, racked up over 10,000 purchases from unsuspecting buyers by claiming to provide protection against harmful apps. Virus Shield also claimed to provide scans in real-time and protection of personal information. In reality, the application simply changed a red “x” graphic into a red check mark graphic; This graphical change symbolized that the user was protected.

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AOL Mail has been hacked and several users have reported their accounts are being used to send spam to others.

Although AOL has confirmed the hack, which thousands were complaining about on Twitter, it is currently unknown how widespread the issue is.

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Microsoft won't be issuing any more patches or updates to Windows XP, at least to the general public, but this week the company ended up fixing a problem that was causing some PCs with the 12-year-old OS not to boot up.

The problem wasn't with Windows XP itself, but with new antivirus definitions that were made available for the free Microsoft Security Essentials program. The issue was experienced by many Neowin readers, who wrote about the problem on our forums.

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A security breach at Michaels Stores lasted eight months and affected about 3 million customers, the company said Thursday.

The news comes three months after the nation's largest crafts chain told customers it learned of a possible hack. It's been investigating since then.

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The "Heartbleed" exploit found in OpenSSL earlier this week has been the subject of a ton of discussion on the Internet, along with a lot of fear about its ramifications. Now the National Security Agency, which is already dealing with its own PR problems in explaining its Internet spying activities, is denying a report that it knew about the "Heartbleed" issue before it went public.

The claim was first made by Bloomberg, which reported, via unnamed sources, that the NSA not only knew about "Heartbleed" for two years and used it to obtain intelligence data without informing any other agency of the vulnerability in the OpenSSL system.

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The "Heartbleed" exploit in the OpenSSL cryptographic software has been getting a ton of media attention this week, The issue has caused many software companies to quickly patch their OpenSSL-based products, and website administrators are urging customers to change their passwords.

In the middle of all this, Microsoft has quietly issued a post on its security blog that claims users of its many online services don't have to worry about "Heartbleed". The post states that the company has conducted a review of its online services this week following the discovery of the OpenSSL flaw.

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Microsoft has tried to make the case that Chromebooks with Google's Chrome OS are not "real" laptops. Today, Google is taking a page out of Microsoft's "Scroogled" playbook by using the end of Windows XP support to make the case for Chromebooks for businesses.

In a post on its Enterprise blog, Google stated that from now until June 30th, companies that contact Chromebooks for Business sales will get $100 for each managed device that is bought by the customer. Google is also offering $200 off the recently launched VMware Desktop as a Service, which will allow businesses to access Windows apps remotely on Chromebooks.

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A new security flaw affecting OpenSSL, the popular cryptographic library used by many websites, has been discovered and is reported to be very serious.

According to the Heartbleed website, the zero-day vulnerability found in OpenSSL affects the stable version 1.0.1 and the 1.0.2 beta version. Older versions of OpenSSL such as 0.9.8 used in Mac OS and iOS and 1.0.0 are not vulnerable to "Heartbleed". Although the vulnerability has been addressed in OpenSSL's version 1.0.1g, it is present in prior versions up to 1.0.1f.

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Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services.  This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides.  However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.

Our strategic priority for Ubuntu is making the best converged operating system for phones, tablets, desktops and more. In fact, our user experience, developer tools for apps and scopes, and commercial relationships have been constructed specifically to highlight third party content and services (as opposed to our own); this is one of our many differentiators from our competitors.

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